Living Room
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The success of these interiors lies in the way existing pieces are gently drawn together within the overall scheme.
Every room feels warm and inviting – just like the people who live here!

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We used earthy, natural tones with touches of dirty blues and greens to allow the outlook to be the hero

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Blue Mountains Home

The owners of this mountain retreat love it all. They
bought the property in 2014 as a weekender, but spend
increasing amounts of time here, drawn to the tranquility
and their love of cool-climate gardening. Built in 1990,
their home is a single-level dwelling surrounded by
magnificent gardens. From the outset, the owners loved
the overall setting, but felt the interiors needed a refresh.
In 2016, they engaged Dods and Zuccon Architects and
designer Kerry Selby Brown to help them modernise the
layout. They reconfigured the floor plan to improve the
flow, enlarging several windows to maximise natural light

and views. The result is a spacious home where every room
is generous in scale and outlook. There are two bedrooms
and two studies, with the main bedroom suite at one end and
the guestroom and studies at the other. In between are the
living spaces, including separate formal living and dining
rooms, the kitchen and casual living and dining zones.
When the renovations wrapped up, the owners felt their
existing furnishings didn’t quite look the part. They called
on expertise of Studio Kate, to add warmth, comfort and personality to their interiors. “Our brief was to pull together the existing art
and furniture and create a comfortable, cohesive, beautiful
interior,” says Kate. “We worked to soften the overall palette
with sympathetic new pieces – soft furnishings, wallpaper,
paint, lighting and accessories – throughout the house.”
The starting point was the flooring. “We sanded, restained
and waxed the original spotted-gum boards to a warm
ebonised walnut and this formed our foundation,” says Kate.
Area rugs and runners from Robyn Cosgrove followed,
grounding each room with textured, soft palettes. Next came
the key furniture pieces, all carefully chosen and placed,
and then the all-important layering: custom bedheads,
bedlinen, cushions, throws, occasional furniture and feature
lighting draw each space together to create a warm,
considered and inviting interior. It’s all woven together with
a colour palette inspired by the spectacular landscape. “We
used earthy, natural tones with touches of dirty blues and
greens to allow the outlook to be the hero,” says Kate.
The result is testament to “the transformative power of
interior decorating”, says Kate. “It’s not necessary to replace
every item. In some instances, we re-covered existing pieces
that were comfortable and had good scale. In others, we
made treasured heirlooms the hero.” In the formal dining
room, for example, the existing dining table was retained
and teamed with new low-profile club chairs, while the light
fitting was replaced with a contemporary blown-glass
pendant. In the casual dining zone, they opted to keep the
Arthur G dining chairs but swapped the square table for a
spectacular round one with marble top.
There are bold interplays of pattern too. In the formal
living room, a striking tartan wool rug anchors the room.
The guestroom boasts a striking striped Cole & Son wallpaper,
while in the powder room a stunning fern-patterned
wallpaper sings against the existing marble vanity.
“The success of these interiors lies in the way existing
pieces are gently drawn together within the overall scheme.
Every room feels warm and inviting – just like the people
who live here!” says Kate.

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Next project:

Horden House